“Practice Random Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty”

The Kindness Offensive was born earlier this year on Hampstead Heath (London, UK), when James Hunter, David Goodfellow and David Crane, set up a desk on Parliament Hill and asked passing members of the public to describe what act of kindness they would like done for them.

As a result, a granny with arthritis got a new fridge, one that she wouldn’t have to bend down to open, a father and his kids got to train with the Moscow State Circus, and one young boy got a red electric guitar. Now the trio is distributing supplies amongst some of London’s most marginalised, hungry and homeless.

“We are phone whisperers in essence,” laughs Goodfellow, “we ring up companies, explain what we’re doing, and give them the opportunity to do something nice.”

Adapted from: The Big Issue,
Article by Daisy Greenwell

From The Youtube Home of
The Kindness Offensive:

“We aim to inspire, have fun and help out where we can.
We love doing what we do, so have a look and if you think you have a genuinely-interesting fun-mission you would like ‘The Kindness Offensive’ to have a go at – something that would really make you or a Friend/Family Member/Cause happy – then click here to send us a message or email us at TheKindnessOffensive@nulllive.co.uk

“Who knows you might be the focus for the Kindness Offensive!”


Compiled by Zen Moments


Random Acts of Kindness
Random Acts of Kindness
By The Editors of Conari Press

“In 1982, California peace activist Ann Herbert wrote on a place-mat at a restaurant “Practice random acts of kindness and senseless acts of beauty.” A fellow diner was impressed by these words, and wrote them down. Gradually they spread and inspired conversation and thought. This international best-seller greatly accelerated the process. Today there is a World Kindness Movement and many organizations spreading the concept of kindness.

The concept of random acts of kindness is an antidote to the concept of random acts of violence. Random acts of kindness are far more common than random acts of violence, and the more they are encouraged, the more they will dominate.

Random acts of kindness can be as simple as talking to strangers, as inconspicuous as allowing people in a hurry to get ahead of you in line, as generous as doing unsolicited chores for people in need, as philanthropic as paying for a stranger’s dinner or sending books to a sick child.”
Amazon Review


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